“I Like Old Clothes”

This was originally published in 1976, but is being reissued this summer with new illustrations by Patrice Barton.  I don’t remember the original, but this version is certainly delightful.

The poem, by Mary Ann Hoberman, is especially appropriate at this time in my house.  The girls have been wearing a lot of hand-me-downs, recycled clothes, and DIY clothes.  Much like the kids in the book, they think it’s kind of fun to take something and make it their own (or have mom make it into something new – see my experiment here).  I don’t think the girls think much about the life an item of clothing has lived before it comes to them, but the kids in the story sure do.  They don’t want clothes that don’t have a story – they want to try and figure out how the clothes lived before they came to live with them.

It’s a great story and made me think (as a mom) about how thankful I am for friends who pass along clothes, and how I can take something and make it new to my girls.

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I received this book from the publisher via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.  All opinions are my own.

“A Song for My Sister”

Lesley Simpson’s story about a young girl named Mira who wishes for a sister is a great story about how what you wish for may not be exactly what you want at first.  Mira’s wish takes four years to come true.  However, when her sister arrives, all she does is scream….and scream….and scream.

The baby only stops screaming at her naming ceremony eight days after her birth (the family is Jewish), when Mira sings her a song.  This turns into Mira’s second wish, that she and her sister always sing duets – special sister songs that they will make up.

My 4-year old liked this book because she thought it was funny that the baby wouldn’t stop screaming.  She is the baby of our house, so other than the slightly younger kids at daycare, she’s never really around an infant.  She really liked that Mira was the one to get the baby to stop screaming – in fact, I heard her singing Mira’s song as she was getting ready for bed.  She likes it when I sing her to sleep, so I figured that would make an impact.

The illustrations by Tatjana Mai-Wyss are very nice.  There’s plenty of expression in the characters and and you can see the Mira’s frustration with her sister’s screaming.  In fact, in one picture, Mira is supposedly sleeping in her treehouse with underwear in her ears and my daughter wanted to see the underwear!  Of course, she couldn’t see them clearly, but we pretended they were there.

This is probably a book best read to children, as it has a few words that may be difficult for a young reader to pronounce.

I received this book from the publisher through Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.  All opinions are my own.

“The Lonely Book” – A Book Lover’s Tear Jerker

I will admit that I teared up while reading this book. When I was a little girl, I often wondered what happened to the books in the library.  This story answers that question.

A book is sitting on the shelf, and it is well-loved by all of the kids.  However, it eventually falls from popularity.  A little girl picks up the book and immediately falls in love with it.  As is the case with library books, she has to return it.

The book ends up in the library’s basement, dreaming of the little girl who loved it so well.  And a little girl grows up never quite forgetting the book she loved.

I’m not going to give away the ending, but The Lonely Book by Kate Bernheimer and illustrated by Chris Sheban is a delightful story about the life-cycle of books and the attachments that kids make to the books they love.

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I received this book from the publisher via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.  All opinions are my own.